Tag: Facts

Velocipede Bicycle History and Facts


Velocipede is a term that describes human powered land vehicle with two or more wheels that has managed to become a synonym for the word bicycle in the
early history of those travel devices. However, even though the word “velocipede” was most famously used to describe balanced bicycle designs that had
pedals, the earliest appearance of the world Velocipede was tightly connected with the devices known as dandy horses, draisienne or hobby horses that were
originally invented as by the German Baron Karl Drais. Dandy horse bicycles featured very simple design where users propelled themselves by manually
reaching with legs to the ground where they could walk, run and then rest their legs while the force propelled simple bicycle forward.

Picture Of Different Velocipedes


First notable improvement upon dandy horse design arrived in 1818 by French inventor Nicéphore Niépce (best known as the father of modern photography), who
mounted adjustable seating position

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automotive industry | History, Developments, & Facts

Although steam-powered road vehicles were produced earlier, the origins of the automotive industry are rooted in the development of the gasoline engine in the 1860s and ’70s, principally in France and Germany. By the beginning of the 20th century, German and French manufacturers had been joined by British, Italian, and American makers.

Developments before World War I

Most early automobile companies were small shops, hundreds of which each produced a few handmade cars, and nearly all of which abandoned the business soon after going into it. The handful that survived into the era of large-scale production had certain characteristics in common. First, they fell into one of three well-defined categories: they were makers of bicycles, such as Opel in Germany and Morris in Great Britain; builders of horse-drawn vehicles, such as Durant and Studebaker in the United States; or, most frequently, machinery manufacturers. The kinds of machinery included stationary gas

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Public Transportation Facts – American Public Transportation Association

Public transportation transforms communities and the lives of the people living in them by spurring economic development, promoting sustainable lifestyles and providing a higher quality of life. Every segment of American society—-individuals, families, communities, and businesses—benefits from public transportation.

Public Transportation Consists of a Variety of Modes

  • Buses
  • Light rail
  • Subways
  • Commuter trains
  • Streetcars and trolleys
  • Cable cars
  • Van pool services
  • Ferries and water taxis
  • Paratransit services for Senior citizens and people with disabilities
  • Monorails and tramways

Quick Facts

  • In 2018, Americans took 9.9 billion trips on public transportation.
  • 34 million times each weekday, people board public transportation.
  • Since 1997, public transportation ridership has increased by 21%—a growth rate higher than the 19% increase in U.S. population.
  • Public transportation is a $71 billion industry that employs more than 430,000 people.
  • Approximately 6,800 organizations provide public transportation in the United States.
  • 45% of Americans have no access to public transportation.
  • Millennials
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bicycle | Definition, History, Types, & Facts

Bicycle predecessors

Historians disagree about the invention of the bicycle, and many dates are challenged. It is most likely that no individual qualifies as the inventor and that the bicycle evolved through the efforts of many. Although Leonardo da Vinci was credited with having sketched a bicycle in 1492 in his Codex Atlanticus, the drawing was discovered to be a forgery added in the 1960s. Another presumed bicycle ancestor, the vélocifère, or célérifère, of the 1790s was a fast horse-drawn coach that is not considered to be a predecessor of the bicycle.


Draisiennes, hobby-horses, and other velocipedes

The first two-wheeled rider-propelled machine for which there is indisputable evidence was the draisienne, invented by Baron Karl von Drais de Sauerbrun of Germany. In 1817 he rode it for 14 km (9 miles), and the following year he exhibited it in Paris. Although von Drais called his device

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